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Architect nurtured his CMU students

| Wednesday, July 2, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
Gary Kelly Carlough died Sunday, June 29, 2014.

Gary Carlough was a devoted husband, father and teacher who will be remembered for the passion he had for his craft and his dedication to those he loved.

“Gary was really a wonderful man,” his wife, Anne Chen, said. “He influenced a lot of people.”

Gary Kelly Carlough of Fox Chapel, an architect who worked on projects such as the Gateway Center T station, died on Saturday, June 29, 2014. He was 62.

Mr. Carlough earned his bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of Arizona and pursued further studies at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London.

He and Chen started Edge Studio in Garfield in 1995 and lived in a house they designed together. He spent 20 years teaching architecture at Carnegie Mellon University.

“He was greatly respected and much liked by studio faculty,” said Stephen Lee, head of the School of Architecture. “He put in far more hours in studio than required and had the respect of teachers and students alike.”

Lee described Mr. Carlough as humble, approachable and knowledgeable, and a great person for students and faculty to know.

“He was very dedicated to teaching,” Chen said.

Since his death, she said, she has received numerous emails from his former students, “expressing sadness and how great of a professor he was.”

“A number of his students worked with us at Edge. He was always incredibly proud of the fact that he had nurtured them in studio at CMU and then in the office.”

Mr. Carlough was genuinely invested in making the city a better place to live, Chen said. He served on the board of Quantum Theater and on the Design Committee of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.

“What has really struck me is the outpouring of support,” she said. “People are making clear how happy he made them.”

In addition to his wife, Anne, Mr. Carlough is survived by his sons, Todd Carlough of Washington, D.C., Hall Carlough of New York City and Xing Carlough of Fox Chapel, and his siblings, Ken Carlough of Clinton, Conn.; Kelly Fleming of Greenville, N.C.; and Amy Weickert of Fremont, Ohio.

He was preceded in death by his father, Howard Spencer Carlough, and his mother, Emily Kelly Carlough.

A celebration of his life will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Pittsburgh Athletic Association, 4215 Fifth Ave. in Oakland. Interment will be private.

Corinne Kennedy is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7823 or ckennedy@tribweb.com.

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