Share This Page

Never forget the key role education plays in our society

This week, Nov. 11-17, marks the 80th annual observation of American Education Week, a time in which we celebrate the tremendous impact learning has on our society.

It is certainly appropriate to celebrate this nation's schools. All over the country, educators - teachers, administrators, school board members and other school staff - work hard to ensure the success of an educational system that, while not without its faults, still remains the foundation by which we succeed as a country.

It is important that none of us forget the key role education plays in our society. It prepares youngsters for adulthood, so that they may form the next generation of leaders. It will yield countless young Americans prepared to develop strong families, and thus, strong communities. Without education, we as a nation would be lost.

It is important to note the responsibility we as parents have in improving on the successes of our educational system. Each of us has an obligation to stake a claim in our children's learning experience. Our duty is not simply to buy new school clothes each fall and make sure our children make the bus each weekday morning. It involves a commitment to show an active interest in their success in the classroom.

Connellsville Area School District educators stress the importance of that commitment. Their responsibility is to foster pride among their students and to instill in them a belief that education holds the key to realizing their hopes and dreams.

They note, too, the role parents can play in that process. "Together: Making Public Schools Great for Every Child" is the theme of Connellsville Area's observance of American Education Week. It points to the importance of a cooperative effort between teachers, parents and children in the education process. Jane Culver, a Dunbar Borough Elementary School teacher and president of the Connellsville Area Education Association (CAEA), stressed that in a recent letter to The Daily Courier.

"A child's chances of success skyrocket if the partnership between the home and school is a strong one," Culver wrote.

Indeed, a parents taking an active role in his or her child's education, combined with a committed and creative teaching staff, will, more than anything, produce a willingness in students to learn.

We urge parents to take the time to help their children learn, to show a genuine interest in their children's success, rather than simply shuffling them off to school and hoping they'll do well. We owe it to our children, and to ourselves, to put education first in their lives, and ours.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.