TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Saturday Essay

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Friday, May 18, 2012, 5:46 p.m.
 

The only thing constant in greenhousing is change. And things are changing rapidly and early this year.

The Roman Delight lettuce, ready to bolt, is exhausted. Nearly 30 of the loose, tender heads made for great salads on many a neighborhood dinner table.

And now coming in is the piece de resistance for many salad lovers -- the Romaine. So robust it is that only three tasty leaves could make for a filling meal. (But, hey, why not add a fourth?)

The soil in the pots of the devoured Roman Delight has been reconstituted; extra spinach and additional flat parsley, the latter of which will join the celery tops to be cut and sun-dried for winter use, already are thriving. Once the Romaine is gone, baby carrots will join the nursery.

Change won't come as often when June bows and spring escapes. The greenhouse, rounded out with peppers and assorted herbs, will fall into a nice summer-long routine of grow-grow-grow, cut-cut-cut and pick-pick-pick, as will the rest of this year's vegetable crop in the adjacent five raised beds.

On wind-swept stormy days, residents of the greenhouse will boast of their safety. On pristine sunny days, tenants of the beds will tout their liberty. But no matter the weather, the proprietor will revisit his crops several times a day and, as Nathaniel Hawthorne once put it, "stand in deep contemplation over my ... progeny with a love that nobody could share or conceive of who had never taken part in the process of creation."

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Pirates notebook: Melancon bails out Watson with extended outing
  2. Steelers’ Bell unsure why NFL reduced his suspension
  3. McCutchen, Pirates cruise past Twins
  4. NHL notebook: Olympic hockey champion Craig to sell prized memorabilia items
  5. Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Association seeks aid to finance future upkeep
  6. Fed holds steady on rates
  7. Chiefs star Berry beats cancer, returns to field
  8. Gameday: Pirates at Reds, July 30, 2015
  9. Beaver County widow won’t lose home over $6.30 late fee
  10. Folding chair collapses, child loses tips of at least 2 fingers in Arlington
  11. Steelers unfazed by Brady suspension saga