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Eric Holder: Race-baiter

| Saturday, July 14, 2012, 8:55 p.m.

"Race-baiting” is “the act of using racially derisive language, actions or other forms of communication in order to anger or intimidate or coerce a person or group of people.”

Once upon a time in the United States, it was used by whites to incite blacks, whose incitement then was used as an excuse by whites to further oppress, attack and even kill them.

But in the modern era, the unsavory paradigm has turned even more perverted, too often employed by black “leaders” with black audiences to manufacture outrage against mythical oppression and discrimination.

Think of Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and Jeremiah Wright.

And think, too, of Eric Holder, the attorney general of the United States.

Speaking last week to delegates at the NAACP convention in Houston, Mr. Holder likened voter ID laws to “a poll tax” that takes America back to its Jim Crow days.

Never mind that free identification will be provided to any voter who doesn't have and/or can't afford it — and never mind that those still without IDs can cast provisional ballots — Holder says the Obama administration “will not allow political pretexts to disenfranchise American citizens of their most precious rights.”

Yet it is Holder who uses the political pretext of race-baiting to undermine the very franchise he's sworn to protect.

And yet again, Eric Holder shows his unworthiness for his position. So once again, we call on him to resign.

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