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Union stalking

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Sunday, Sept. 2, 2012, 8:56 p.m.

Helping to put the “thug” in union thuggery, Pennsylvania and at least three other states grant Big Labor certain “exemptions” to stalking and trespassing laws, trampling what should be clearly defined citizen protections against harassment, according to a new report by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Since when are state laws conditional upon who violates them? Apparently, since labor uses its political muscle to mitigate these laws in Illinois, California, Nevada and Pennsylvania.

As detailed in “Sabotage, Stalking & Stealth Exemptions: Special State Laws for Labor Unions,” all states have penalties against stalking. But in the Keystone State, for example, the law “shall not apply to conduct by a party to a labor dispute,” the chamber reports.

Consider the “campaign” by the Philadelphia construction unions against Post Brothers Apartments in that city. Allegedly, the pregnant wife of one of the company's owners “is routinely followed taking their toddler to preschool by picketers,” according to Post Brothers.

And trespassing in California? That's OK, too. The chamber reports that police refused to remove union members who allegedly harassed customers outside a Ralphs grocery store, even though the reported confrontations occurred on a store-owned sidewalk.

Such legal leeway for unions to apply harassment and even intimidation is inexcusable and must be purged from state laws.

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