TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Corn hole: Repeal RFS

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, 9:01 p.m.
 

With drought and other market conditions exposing Washington's wasteful ethanol favoritism like never before, the Environmental Protection Agency should waive this year's Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) — and Congress should repeal the RFS law.

The Department of Agriculture bought about 42 percent of the drought-reduced corn crop to meet this year's RFS requirement for blending ethanol into vehicle fuels. Livestock producers, their feed costs spiking due to corn's scarcity, favor the RFS waiver that the EPA is considering. Yet Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, former governor of ethanol epicenter Iowa, supports the status quo.

Corn ethanol's a losing energy proposition, taking more to produce than it yields as fuel. There would be no U.S. ethanol market without the RFS mandate and stiff tariffs on cheaper foreign alternatives, which raise Americans' food costs by diverting U.S. corn to ethanol production.

With the EPA allowing blended fuel to contain 15 percent ethanol, up from 10 percent, damaged engines, voided warranties and lower fuel efficiency add to the pain of taxpaying motorists, boaters and power-tool users. And meanwhile, development of more economically sensible biofuel sources, such as switchgrass, languishes.

Today's supply-and-demand situation exacerbates the glaring downsides of corn ethanol and government market intervention on its behalf. The EPA should never again mull an RFS waiver; rather, Congress must end this market-distorting political sop to corn producers.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Judge: UPMC must provide in-network access to Highmark Medicare members
  2. Steelers’ defense unfazed by noise, believes in potential
  3. Police charge third man in fatal shooting of teenager in Monroeville
  4. Pittsburgh Police arrest man in turquoise socks they say robbed Oakland bank
  5. Inmate assaults Westmoreland County sheriff’s deputy at UPMC Presbyterian Hospital
  6. Man dies trying to escape fire at his North Buffalo home
  7. International counterfeiter sentenced in Pittsburgh to 7.5 years in prison
  8. Obama gets state, local allies for key initiatives
  9. Sources: Ex-House Speaker Hastert paid to conceal misconduct
  10. Early Friday dismissals to continue for Blairsville-Saltsburg students
  11. Blairsville accepts salt bid with steep cost hike, hopes for better price through state program