| Opinion/The Review

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

The voter ID ruling: A poison pill

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012, 1:50 p.m.

Under the standard set by the state Supreme Court in remanding Pennsylvania's contested voter ID law to Commonwealth Court, there never can be such a law in Penn's Wood.

The high court, ruling 4-2 on Tuesday, gave Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Simpson until Oct. 2 to determine if the state is providing “liberal” access to new photo ID cards or if any voter will be unable to cast a ballot because of the voter ID law. (It was Judge Simpson who, in August, declined to enjoin the law's implementation.)

But by the Supreme Court's standard, any voter — perhaps someone who's never voted and has no intention of voting but is recruited by any anti-voter ID sympathizers? — effectively can scotch the law.

The fix is in.

Surely if Simpson upholds his original ruling, the ACLU will produce a perpetual supply of “disenfranchised voters” in a perpetual line of appeals.

Thus, the Supreme Court's ruling is a poison pill bordering on a Hobson's choice that will guarantee that elections in Pennsylvania will continue to be loosey-goosey affairs.

Gee, what's next, an orchestrated attack on voter registration because a potential registrant supposedly doesn't have “access” to a readily available voter registration form?

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Founder of Z&M Cycle Sales in Hempfield killed in Florida motorcycle crash
  2. Starkey: Tomlin lived in his fears
  3. Increasing player salaries pinch financial flexibility of Pirates
  4. Slain St. Clair officer walked into ‘worst nightmare’ for police
  5. No. 11 Purdue presents tall order for Pitt
  6. Film session: Long shots dotted Steelers’ passing game
  7. Penguins’ reshuffled top line of Crosby, Dupuis, Kunitz looks familiar
  8. Steelers receiver Wheaton takes advantage of opportunity in breakout game
  9. 2,200 union employees of ATI lose coverage
  10. Pittsburgh region’s philanthropic sector at top of nation’s pack
  11. Pa. Supreme Court: Highmark Medicare Advantage members to retain access to UPMC