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Obama's questionable judgment

| Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, 12:11 a.m.

It is apparent the United States is a second-rate country. We are no longer an example of an economically thriving, successful democracy to the rest of the world. It is obvious we have been sadly weakened when terrorist groups can attack our embassies and their governments fail to protect us.

President Obama has failed us. Although charming, glib and personable, he has been a disaster as president. His judgment calls leave much to be desired. Did he exercise poor judgment in:

• Leading from behind in the Arab Spring?

• Not attending over 50 percent of the intelligence briefings so he could campaign for re-election?

• Adopting a policy of appeasement in the Middle East?

• Supporting green energy and failing to tap all of our resources to remove us from energy dependency?

• Establishing another entitlement program — Obamacare— before fixing the current unsustainable ones, i.e., Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security.

Former President Bill Clinton said that no president could have solved our economic crisis in just four years. But no president caused this much deterioration in the history of our country.

The most important question is: Would we be exercising poor judgment by re-electing President Obama for another four years?

Joan Guadagno Santelli

Dover, Del.

The writer is a Tarentum native.

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