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Atheists & the Grinch

| Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012, 9:00 p.m.

Assaults by the Freedom From Religion Foundation on our schools and towns across the country have to be stopped.

Is this small minority of people so intolerant they can't accept differing opinions, i.e. religious expression/freedom of speech? Instead, they try to silence religion. There is no established religion in these towns. People aren't forced to compromise their beliefs or jailed because they don't believe.

If you were to ask the Founding Fathers if a Ten Commandments monument was an establishment of religion, they would think you were joking. I'm more worried about kids who see the cast of “Jersey Shore” as role models than I am about the monument.

The Freedom From Religion Facebook page proudly shows its public displays, banners like, “Nobody Died For Your Sins. Jesus Christ Is A Myth,” which was in a public park during Easter, and “Yes Virginia, There Is No God” on a public bus at Christmas. Does freedom of speech mean freedom to mock, disrespect and promote intolerance? Sounds more like legalized bullying.

I keep thinking of the Christmas classic, “How The Grinch Stole Christmas,” which says you can try to take away our signs, crosses, tar-tinkers and flu-flubers — but Christmas will still come. That story ended much differently — the Grinch had a heart.

Atheist, are you proud and out of the closet? That's your right and privilege. Just don't think that right entitles you to push the rest of us into a closet 'cause that ain't happening.

Debra Sprague

Gilpin

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