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For U.S. Senate: Elect Casey, Raese & Mandel

| Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, 8:56 p.m.
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JASMINE GOLDBAND
West Virginia senatorial candidate John Raese is interviewed by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review at the Scaife Foundation, Downtown, Thursday, September 23, 2010. (Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review) (JLG WVSen 26 2.jpg:, goes with Wereshagin story intended for publication 9/26/10).

There's one contested U.S. Senate race each in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio this year. We recommend voters choose the following on Nov. 6:

Bob Casey Jr. We don't agree with some of the policies advocated by the first-term Democrat. But we have come to appreciate him on a personal level and to admire the congenial manner in which he interacts with not only his constituents but also Pat Toomey, his junior Republican colleague in the Senate. It's that kind of personal comity that serves Pennsylvania and the nation best.

Mr. Casey is being challenged by Republican Tom Smith. He was a Democrat committeeman as recently as 2010. Despite our policy differences with Casey, we prefer the Democrat we know to the Republican of convenience.

Re-elect Bob Casey Jr.

John Raese. The noted Mountain State industrialist and media titan has been a player in West Virginia politics for 30 years, behind the scenes and as a candidate. This is his fourth run for U.S. Senate since 1984. And given the shifting prevailing winds of the electorate in West Virginia, this should be Mr. Raese's year. He's a straight shooter who does not suffer fools — at all. He should have a field day in Washington.

Yes, Raese has a formidable task in once again challenging the popular Democrat incumbent Joe Manchin (Raese lost to the former West Virginia governor in a special election two years ago), whose moderation also is attractive to Republicans and independents. But there's a better option for the new era that's upon us.

And that's John Raese.

Josh Mandel. Democrats have taken to childish smears to dismiss the Republican state treasurer in Ohio. “Inexperienced” and “lacking substance,” they say. “The kid,” say others. It's as sure a sign as any that the “sure-thing” re-election of first-term Democrat U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown isn't.

Mr. Mandel, who served two tours of duty in Iraq, is a fresh face always ready to challenge the “conventional wisdom” that isn't necessarily conventional or wise.

And the GOP smells blood. Despite Mr. Brown's name recognition and resume — he was a seven-term congressman first — this race is rated a tossup.

Ohioans would serve the Buckeye State best by retiring Brown and sending Josh Mandel to the U.S. Senate.

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