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Greensburg Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 9:01 p.m.

Laurel: To state Sen. Kim Ward and Rep. George Dunbar. The Westmoreland lawmakers are turning up the heat on ex-board members of the abandoned Monsour Medical Center to take responsibility for this badly deteriorating building, which poses a public safety threat. That said, where are Westmoreland's commissioners and other state lawmakers? The Monsour mess no longer can be ignored.

Lance: To the Laurel Mountain Ski Resort money pit. Now comes word that this slippery slope of public subsidies needs a major electrical upgrade. And who's going to pay for this? It's bad enough the state has committed $6.5 million for renovations on top of what was squandered 13 years ago, when the ski area opened on the public's dime — and flopped within a few years.

On the “Watch List”: Connellsville's cash flow. The slow collection of earned income taxes to meet the city's payroll is one issue. Another is the apparent proclivity by the city to budget grossly more in revenue than what's actually received — last year, by more than $140,000. Here's hoping that optimistic guesswork won't smack city fathers at year's end.

Laurel: To Westmoreland County's regional emergency operating center. Discussed for years, the $1.8 million facility, to be based at Arnold Palmer Regional Airport, finally is moving ahead. It will house $7 million in emergency equipment that's currently scattered across the county and will enhance emergency training and operations.

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