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The Thursday wrap

| Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, 8:57 p.m.

The big guns of big liberalism are using Hurricane Sandy to make big, bogus and politicized arguments for an even larger federal government. “A big storm requires big government,” blared a New York Times editorial even before the storm had run its course on Tuesday. Of course, it was a setup to bash Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney for supposedly wanting to gut FEMA. Actually, he wants to streamline FEMA and give more direct control to the states to make its response to disasters more effective. And never mind that it's Barack Obama who, in his fiscal 2013 budget, actually proposed cutting the federal disaster agency's budget by more than $10 billion. But, hey, why let the facts get in the way of promoting the failed president you've endorsed, right? ... Never mind that the United States government has a Department of Commerce, Mr. Obama says he'll create even more bureaucracy in a second term by creating a Cabinet-level Department of Business. Why doesn't Obama simply name it for what he intends it to be — Department of National Industrial Policy, charged with the fatal conceit of further commanding the economy from his central government gun turret? ... Taxpayers, courtesy of the Department of Energy, spent about $300,000 for each of the 400 jobs “created” by the now bankrupt A123 Systems electric-car battery company, reports The Washington Times. It is the sad essence of the failure of command economics in general and Obamanomics in particular.

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