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Hurricane Benghazi: A full-blown scandal

| Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, 9:00 p.m.

Hurricane Sandy just might have bolstered Barack Obama's re-election fortunes, diverting attention from the growing scandal that should be known as Hurricane Benghazi. That's the bad news.

The good news is that should Mr. Obama win a second term, he likely won't escape a full-blown congressional investigation of what more and more appears to be a gross dereliction of duty by the commander in chief.

And it's not unfathomable to think, should the administration not come clean, that House Republicans soon might begin discussing articles of impeachment.

Almost daily, new and unsavory details have been leaking about the Obama administration's non-response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attack on the consulate in Libya's second-largest city that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three others.

The administration hasn't been able to keep its stories straight (if they ever were straight to begin with). The stories sometimes change on a daily basis. The buses are rolling and people are being thrown under them.

The stonewalling has every appearance of being a political operation to cover up the fact that Obama & Co. left four Americans to fend for themselves in a foreign outpost against well-organized terrorist murderers. One report has it that CIA operatives on the ground in Benghazi thrice asked and thrice were denied help.

Why? Politics? Incompetence? Americans deserve an answer.

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