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Alle-Kiski Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, 9:03 p.m.

Laurel: To local school districts. Facing the uncertainty of Tuesday's weather and the chance that Hurricane Sandy would wreak havoc in the region, local school districts pulled the trigger early Monday to cancel school the next day. Although Tuesday brought us some heavy rain and little else, it was a prudent move to cancel.

Lance: To blowing smoke. When the New Kensington-Arnold School Board decided to drop about a half-million dollars into artificial turf at Memorial Stadium, one of the justifications was the district would rent the stadium to the WPIAL for football and soccer playoff games and make money. With Burrell being forced to play there tonight due to the weather, Memorial has hosted like three games in four years. Now there's a return on investment for this financially stressed district.

On the “Watch List”: The Steelers-SEA dispute. The football team says its Heinz Field lease with the Sports & Exhibition Authority calls for the SEA to pick up two-thirds of the cost of its proposed $38 million expansion that includes 3,000 seats and a second large scoreboard. It plans to sue to enforce the provision. The SEA's share (to service a bond issue) would come from a surcharge on Steelers tickets and parking used by game-day fans but also work-week taxpayers. Taxpayers put up more than half of the original construction bill for Heinz Field — nearly $160 million of the nearly $281 million price tag (and still paying for the “privilege”) — and have no business guaranteeing more debt.

Good Luck!: Seven Alle-Kiski Valley football teams are in the WPIAL playoffs, which start tonight.

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