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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, 8:48 p.m.

One of the rare pieces of good news to come out of Tuesday's election is that the Democrat-controlled Senate still won't have enough votes to ratify the onerous, sovereignty-destroying Law of the Sea Treaty, better known as LOST. Here's to small blessings. ... Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, is a big supporter of LOST. And now that Mr. Obama has been re-elected, he's licking his chops that he'll be tapped to replace Hillary Clinton as secretary of State. If chosen, we can only wonder what pompous affectation he'll employ to pass himself off as a suave internationalist. ... The Social Security Administration is reducing public office hours, claiming the move is necessary to reduce overtime pay. But the agency also says it has no idea how much the move will save. Well, this is a government operation, after all. ... Congressman Mike Kelly, R-Butler, is leading the House effort to get to the bottom of the Obama administration's Benghazi scandal. He penned a letter, also signed by dozens of colleagues, asking for the answers to some very simple questions that could reveal major administration lies. Here's to the kind of straight shooting that Mr. Kelly is known for exposing the kind of dodging and weaving that Obama & Co. has elevated to a new art form. ... It's Veterans Day — honor our vets by flying Old Glory.

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