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More Monsour excuses

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Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, 10:06 p.m.
 

On his hands and knees, former Monsour Medical Center CEO Michael Monsour sifted through garbage at the decaying hospital complex, searching for financial records of obvious importance to him.

But confidential patient files also dumped in the debris? Those he left behind.

Mr. Monsour says that as president of Key Care Home Health, which leased the hospital's annex before it closed, he went to the site to remove only Key Care business records — not patient or doctor records strewn about in the clutter. This, after reports of the abandoned medical files caught the attention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which has begun an investigation into whether federal privacy laws had been breached.

Monsour insists he's not responsible for those confidential files, which he says were secured. Then who is?

It's high time state and federal authorities find out, starting with the ex-CEO of an abandoned medical center that today has degenerated into a public safety threat.

In the meantime, the state Attorney General's Office says it will determine how best to secure those discarded patient files. And soon, we trust.

Such appalling disregard for patients and the public underscores the reprehensible mindset of the hospital's managers, who dumped their “legacy” on Jeannette six years ago. It's their legacy — and their mess — to clean up.

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