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Grieving for America

| Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:57 p.m.

Today, I grieve for America. The days of the glory of liberty and the light of a republic established by the great freedoms of the Constitution is over.

I do not wallow in the defeat of a candidate, but I cry for the death of the principles upon which our great nation was established.

America has chosen a path of no return. We the people have chosen to empower the very entity that we fought and feared — a large, centralized federal government.

King George III was defeated by people who prayed for life, liberty and property. These people shed blood for our freedom and country.

We were handed a torch and asked to not let it burn out. All we needed to do was hold it high and remember the blood from which it was lit.

The American people have taken our torch of freedom and thrown it into the ring of the federal government.

We have voted away the very control our Founders wanted — for the people and the states to protect us from the federal government.

We have moved into a stage when people are voting themselves the assets that belong to others. There is a belief that being rich is evil and those with money should give it to others to create equality. In fact, trying to create equality destroys incentive and apathy becomes the norm.

Welcome to the United States. I will pray for all of our leaders and encourage them to think of the purpose and the history of our great nation.

Please remember the people and the liberties that are inherent in nature. Remember America.

Jessica Johns

Vandergrift

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