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GOP, 2012 & 2016 I

| Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, 8:59 p.m.

Joseph Sabino Mistick's column “What's next for Republicans?” (Nov. 11 and TribLIVE.com) would be amusing were it not so pathetically slanted as to leave one's head shaking in disbelief. Mistick recites a litany of specks and pebbles in the eyes of Republicans while apparently blinded by the log in his own ocular orifice.

Though some of his advisories concerning gay marriage and other social issues may indeed be worthy of attention, his comment on “fear-mongering” Republican ads is ludicrous vis-à-vis the Democrat ads in this election.

Mistick apparently saw neither “Granny being pushed off the cliff” nor the numerous ads targeting Bain Capital and featuring a man assigning direct personal blame to Mitt Romney for the death of his wife from cancer.

Further, Romney never said 47 percent of Americans are “slackers, living off government programs, unable or unwilling to provide for themselves.” He simply said 47 percent or so of Americans pay no income tax and thus probably wouldn't be swayed by arguments that taxes should be lowered.

He never used the term “slackers” and didn't demean those less fortunate in any way, but rather the convoluted tax code.

Yes, Joseph, the Republican Party has some serious soul-searching and regrouping to do. But hopefully, such regrouping will not entail the use of ads in 2016 that remotely sink to the near cesspool level of most of the Democrat ads of this 2012 election season.

Robert J. Beltz

Latrobe

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