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Pittsburgh Tuesday takes

| Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, 8:59 p.m.

Reassessment roller coaster: A party-line vote by Allegheny County Council Democrats raised property taxes by 21 percent last December. Now, the county proposes lowering that levy by 17 percent to comply with state law limiting reassessment revenue windfalls to 5 percent. To taxpayers, it must seem that those Democrats took advantage of them via a temporary windfall that state law doesn't prohibit.

Super scholar: There are lessons aplenty in the story of Wexford's Dakota “Cody” McCoy, 22, a Yale University senior who's one of 32 American students and 80 worldwide receiving the latest round of Rhodes Scholarships. The former National Aviary intern, who'll use the award to pursue a master's degree in zoology, says her parents devoted time each day to teaching her reading and math. And she's a well-rounded young woman, too, competing in track and field, singing in a choral group, binding books by hand and publishing three peer-reviewed research papers. Congratulations, Ms. McCoy.

Rougher road: The Steelers' defense played well, the offense — minus injured Ben Roethlisberger — not so much against the Ravens in Sunday night's 13-10 loss. That leaves Pittsburgh two full games behind Baltimore in the AFC North and a wild-card berth its far more likely path to the postseason than winning the division. Needing wins, the Steelers need to avoid looking past their next game, at Cleveland, to their rematch with the Ravens in Baltimore on Dec. 2.

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