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Climate crock: Facts vs. rhetoric

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Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012, 8:57 p.m.

Nothing better reveals the true agenda of environmental extremists than the fact that even an immediate, total U.S. carbon-emissions halt wouldn't affect climate change significantly — but would cripple America's economy and way of life.

Writing for The Examiner of Washington, Ron Arnold, executive vice president of the Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise, highlights that key conclusion of a new Science and Public Policy Institute report ( ).

If America eliminated all carbon emissions today, says report author Paul Knappenberger, global temperatures would rise just 0.08 degrees Celsius less by 2050, 0.17 degrees Celsius less by 2100 — “amounts that are ... negligible.” That's because the rest of the world would replace U.S. carbon emissions in less than seven years; China alone would do so in less than 11 years.

Bob Ferguson, the institute's president, tells Mr. Arnold that the climate alarmism of “Al Gore and a league of crony capitalists” seeking to make millions of dollars by selling “carbon offsets” is really about “money and power.”

So, don't expect environmental extremists to temper their familiar anti-growth, anti-U.S. rhetoric at this week's new round of United Nations climate talks in Doha, Qatar — where issues include “how to spread the burden of emissions cuts between rich and poor countries,” according to The Associated Press — even though that rhetoric rings more hollow than ever in light of the inconvenient truth about U.S. climate mitigation revealed by the Science and Public Policy Institute.

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