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The Monsour mess ... grows & grows & grows

| Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, 8:57 p.m.

Medical waste left behind by the miserable management of the Monsour Medical Center has prompted yet another state-ordered cleanup after Jeannette officials reported that serious health hazards remain within the former hospital's mold-covered walls.

Sure enough, inspectors on Monday found several gallon containers filled with used needles and other “sharps,” used syringes and broken slides containing human tissue. Heaven knows what's stored inside locked cabinets. The state already has been through the dilapidated building once to remove biohazardous material.

There remain as well reams of still-unsecured patient and doctor files scattered amid the debris.

All this and more are part of the lingering legacy of ex-CEO Michael Monsour and his administrative miscreants, who walked away from the problem-plagued hospital after it flunked a series of state inspections six years ago.

This monument to their temerity is not the taxpayers' problem, nor should it become such.

Whoever was in charge of the building when it closed will be tapped for the cleanup bill, now at about $20,000 and rising, a state environmental official says. With that also comes responsibility for the proper disposition of those medical files and, posthaste, the decrepit building's demolition.

More than enough public time and public resources have been spent exposing the extent of this intolerable mess. It's time to serve notice to those legally responsible to clean it up.

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