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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, 9:00 p.m.
In this image from video, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, left, waves and walks off as a life-sized cardboard cut-out figure of himself is placed next to the microphone during a media conference in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday Jan. 8, 2018.  Prayuth evaded questions by bringing out the life-sized cardboard cut-out of himself and telling reporters to 'ask this guy' if they had 'any questions on politics or conflict,' then turned on his heel and walked off, leaving the mock-up behind, to bemused looks and awkward laughter from the assembled media. (TPBS via AP)
In this image from video, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, left, waves and walks off as a life-sized cardboard cut-out figure of himself is placed next to the microphone during a media conference in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday Jan. 8, 2018. Prayuth evaded questions by bringing out the life-sized cardboard cut-out of himself and telling reporters to 'ask this guy' if they had 'any questions on politics or conflict,' then turned on his heel and walked off, leaving the mock-up behind, to bemused looks and awkward laughter from the assembled media. (TPBS via AP)

An iconic Pennsylvania company could soon be an even bigger player in its field, via its biggest deal ever. “The Hershey Co. has emerged as one of two leading bidders for Nestle SA's American confectionary business,” which Nestle values at $2 billion to $2.5 billion, PennLive reports. Hershey already announced plans to buy Amplify Snack Brands for $921 million. Nestle wants to sell by the end of March. So, with “Crunch” time set for this deal, might it be sealed with a “Kiss”? … Accused of workplace sexual harassment, state Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery County, dropped his 2018 congressional bid but hasn't heeded Gov. Tom Wolf's call to resign. He wrote in a Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed last week that he is “truly sorry for ever saying or doing anything that has made anyone uneasy, uncomfortable, or distressed,” promising to “change my conduct.” Half of the Senate seats are up for election this year, but Mr. Leach's won't be until 2020. Can he convince voters he's a changed man by then? Stay tuned. … The prime minister of Thailand's ruling military junta, which has little tolerance for critical media coverage or dissenting citizens, “assigned a life-size cardboard mock-up of himself to respond to tough questions by journalists,” having the cutout set up behind his microphone last week before walking away, per The Washington Post. File this one under “Don't Give President Trump Any Ideas” — laughable or otherwise, as the Thai prime minister “had previously thrown a banana peel at journalists and threatened others with execution.”

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