TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Saturday essay: Persimmons, anyone?

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, 9:00 p.m.
 

Any gardener worth his mulch loves a challenge. If you see an interesting but unfamiliar plant species on a trip, you think, “Hey, I'd like to grow that!”

So, you snip a few leaves, pick a few berries or pods, then take it all home to identify it. Once you've done that, and as long as it's not an invasive species, you put your junior horticulture skills to the test.

Thus, the great persimmon experiment has begun.

Two persimmons made their way back to Western Pennsylvania from a trip last month to Southern Shores, N.C., along the Outer Banks. Not trees, mind you, but the “fruit,” which technically is a big berry.

Persimmons look like a cross between a half-grown peach and a small tomato. (The fact that the flower sepals stay with the orb when picked reinforces the tomato visual.) Cut it and the “meat” is the consistency of pudding. Taste it and it's just as sweet.

The dozen or so seeds harvested will have to be conditioned (“stratified”) over the winter — kept moist and cool in the refrigerator for three to four months — then planted in the spring.

But it will be many years before any berries are produced. And then only if it can be figured out if this persimmon is male or female and an opposite-sex mate is found for proper pollination.

Can bananas be far behind? As a matter of fact ... .

— Colin McNickle

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Editorials

  1. The Thursday wrap
  2. Medicare @ 50: Sick, getting sicker
  3. At the VA: The waiting dead
  4. Yes, the IRS targeted conservatives
  5. Saturday essay: Dog days bark
  6. The Box
  7. Connellsville police seek help in crime crackdown
  8. Mon-Yough Tuesday takes
  9. Regional growth
  10. U.N. Watch: The ‘race’ is on
  11. Council fails again: Shoot straight, Ford City