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Pittsburgh Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Nov. 22, 2012, 8:51 p.m.

On the “Watch List”: The Heinz Field expansion dispute. After what Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge Joseph James termed Monday's “status conference,” the Steelers and the Sports & Exhibition Authority appear headed to trial over which side should pay to add 3,000 seats, a scoreboard and control room upgrades. Taxpayers can only hope the trial's outcome will reflect their interests by forcing the Steelers — beneficiaries of so many ill-spent taxpayer dollars already — to foot the bill, as the team should.

Laurel: To more computer reuse. Goodwill of Southwestern Pennsylvania has overcome inability to meet demand, which forced a halt to its sales of donated, refurbished, $199.99 “Good-to-Go Computer” systems about 18 months ago. Now, the program's back, providing high-tech bargains, helping fund Goodwill job training and education and keeping heavy metals out of landfills. And with state law banning landfill disposal of computers and related items as of Jan. 24, and new computers sure to be under many Christmas trees, its return is well-timed indeed.

Lance: To ObamaCare's unintended consequences. They're playing out at Community College of Allegheny County, which is cutting about 200 part-time instructors' teaching loads because it can't afford the law's requirement of health coverage for employees working 30 hours a week or more. They're the first such cuts at a Western Pennsylvania college, but surely not the last — and in many businesses, not just higher education.

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