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Greensburg Tuesday takes

| Monday, Dec. 3, 2012, 8:51 p.m.

Unity library's post-mortem: It's curious that while Unity Township paid $50,000 to maintain library services from Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe, that city's library contribution was only $20,000, along with revenue from 0.2 mill — about $13,120. It also explains why Unity supervisors — and, by referendum, residents — closed the book on the township's share of this lopsided deal.

Nice try: A former Unity man convicted of killing Ligonier businessman William McMichael Jones lost his appeal for a lighter sentence. Anthony Mowry's attorney argued that Westmoreland County Judge Al Bell didn't account for the defendant's age (18 at the time) and Mr. Mowry's allegation that Mr. Jones sexually abused him as a child. But in the sentencing transcript, Judge Bell specifically notes his age and mental condition, according to a state Superior Court ruling. Considering the possibility of life in prison, Mowry should be grateful for the nearly 15-year sentence he got.

Truly “higher” education: An agreement between St. Vincent College and Westmoreland County Community College underscores affordability. WCCC students who complete their associate degrees in business, psychology or criminology can transfer to St. Vincent to complete their bachelor's degrees at a considerably savings ($90 per credit for the first two years of study at WCCC instead of $892 per credit at St. Vincent). Instead of paying lip service to the cost of college, both schools are providing a meaningful lesson plan.

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