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Uncle Onyango

| Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, 8:54 p.m.

“Nepotism” barely suffices to describe the special treatment of Onyango Obama by U.S. immigration authorities.

Mr. Obama, 68, the half uncle of President Barack Obama, should have been deported years ago. But his case has been reopened, delaying his departure yet again and potentially enabling him to apply for permanent-resident status.

CNS News reports that the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals has granted Uncle Onyango a rehearing. That's unusual in any case that includes a deportation order — his was issued in 1989 — and especially so when the illegal alien also faces a drunken-driving case, says the executive director of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

In America since 1963, Uncle Onyango was arrested for DUI in Massachusetts in August 2011. That case was continued for one year in March.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement outrageously and unfathomably granted him a stay of deportation to deal with his DUI case — more reason to deport him, not to let him remain — and to seek reopening of his deportation case. The appeals board rehearing compounds that outrage.

The appearance of favoritism is obvious. Uncle Onyango should have been deported long ago and still should be — yesterday.

But then again, Barack Obama's administration isn't exactly tough on illegals in general. Uncle Onyango's deportation case thus is emblematic of a larger outrage — this White House's coddling of illegals, whether motivated by politics or family ties.

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