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Oysters Obama

| Sunday, Dec. 16, 2012, 8:56 p.m.

Error-riddled “science” used as the bogus basis for ruining a Northern California organic oyster-farm business is beyond outrageous.

National Review Online details the struggles of Marin County's Lunny family, their Drakes Bay Oyster Co. and 30-plus employees against the National Park Service and Interior Department, which want the farm for a wilderness area.

The National Academy of Sciences' Corey Goodman, a Stanford and Berkeley professor emeritus, has spent five years probing federal misconduct against the Lunnys.

He says the feds have made false claims contradicting prior state and federal environmental studies of the farm, misrepresented data, enlisted extremists to echo their slant, violated federal law on public comment — and even asserted that specific authorization for extending the farm's lease permits by 10 years, added to a 2009 appropriations bill by U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., enables Interior to shutter the business.

Accusing the Park Service and Interior of “a stunning misuse of science” and following “a predetermined agenda,” not the data, Mr. Goodman says they've “spent a huge amount of money trying to find harm when it doesn't exist.”

Contending they're being deprived of their property without due process, the Lunnys are taking their fight to court, where they deserve to prevail. If they don't, Goodman warns, a precedent favoring perversion of science for extreme environmentalism's sake — an Obama administration hallmark — could be set.

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