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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012, 8:04 p.m.

The New York Post reports that those four State Department officials dismissed because of their complicity in lax security that aided and abetted September's deadly terrorist attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, weren't dismissed at all. None ever left the payroll and all are expected back on the job in one form or another, the Post says. How many more lies will the Obama administration tell about Benghazi? ... The world's longest high-speed railway has bowed in China. It spans the nation's nearly 1,500 miles and reaches speeds of up to 186 mph. Past being prologue, it's only a matter of time before we begin hearing of serious problems — or disasters — because of shoddy Chinese construction. ... The inventor of the wind-up radio tells Great Britain's Daily Mail that “a ‘Google generation' who rely on the Internet for everything (is) in danger of becoming ‘brain-dead.'” Trevor Baylis says today's kids are losing creativity and practical skills because they spend too much time in front of computer screens. And, we add, because they lack critical-thinking skills. ... Will prospective GOP gubernatorial candidate Bruce Castor's support for right-to-work legislation in Pennsylvania force incumbent Republican Gov. Tom Corbett to push the GOP-controlled General Assembly for such a measure? It would be nice to see the governor support a right-to-work law because it's the right thing to do and not out of political opportunism.

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