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Right to work: Pa.'s time is now

| Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Recent federal court rulings rejecting union challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin right-to-work laws confirm such measures' sound legal basis, bode well for Michigan's new right-to-work law and beg this question:

Why does Pennsylvania still lack such a law?

The judge who upheld Indiana's statute rejected union contentions that it overreached, writing that voters “ultimately can decide” its fate, which is “beyond the reach of the federal court,” The Washington Free Beacon reports.

And with the U.S. Supreme Court upholding right-to-work laws since the 1940s, as National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation lawyer Glenn Taubman notes, Indiana's law ultimately should prevail over a union challenge it still faces in state court.

Upholding Wisconsin's law, a federal appeals court in Chicago also overturned a prior ruling that stopped provisions prohibiting automatic union deductions from paychecks and requiring periodic union recertification by workers.

It's past time that all Pennsylvania workers be protected against what Mr. Taubman reminds is “forced unionism and monopoly representation that infringe on individual employees' rights.”

To their credit, six Republican state legislators introduced right-to-work legislation in the General Assembly on Tuesday. And for all Pennsylvania workers' sake — and for that of freedom and liberty, not to mention competitiveness and job retention — the GOP-controlled state House and Senate must approve it and Republican Gov. Tom Corbett must sign it.

Otherwise, they should be prepared to find a new situation.

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