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Greensburg Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

On the “Watch List”:

• Irwin's police chief firing. In hush-hush, “personnel matter” fashion, Irwin's council members and the borough's solicitor provided no information after the former's vote to fire police Chief Joseph Pocsatko. Mr. Pocsatko, 37, said he wasn't informed in advance of the council's vote and will file an appeal through the state's Civil Service Commission. Public official, public money. A public explanation is owed.

• Fayette County's Airport Authority. First the board in a 4-1 vote laid off airport Manager Mary Lou Fast and dummied up. A couple of days later, authority board Chairman Terry Shallenberger Jr. resigned. Inquiring minds want to know what's flying under the authority's radar.

• Electronics dumpers. Effective Thursday, residents no longer can dispose of their old electronic devices — TVs, computers, etc. — with the household trash. They have to be recycled. Inevitably, some lunkheads will dump their unwanted electronics in rural areas. Here's hoping local agencies that have taken the lead in “e-waste” recycling will rise to meet the increased demand.

Laurel: To bridging a divide. The commonly used Route 217 bridge over Norfolk Southern Corp.'s railroad tracks, which divide Derry, will remain open while the state constructs a new bridge, transportation officials say. This isn't merely about convenience. Keeping the bridge open is a matter of public safety for Derry's police and fire departments.

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