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Alle-Kiski Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Laurel: To Sen. Bob Casey. Getting the federal government to do an expensive, potentially dangerous and long-term project like the nuclear dump cleanup in Park Township almost always requires the backing of a powerful elected official. The late Congressman John Murtha got the federal government to start remediating the NUMEC site. In the past year, Casey has picked up Murtha's mantle and made sure this project stays on course.

Laurel: To Allegheny County. It continues to tap the gold mine that is its public parks by contracting private companies to offer money-making recreational and dining activities. A zipline course and a bicycle cafe in North Park are the latest examples. Smart moves — they serve the public and help to defray the parks' cost. We wonder what's in the works for Harrison Hills, Deer Lakes and Boyce parks.

On the “Watch List”: Electronics dumpers. Effective Thursday, residents no longer can dispose of their old electronic devices — TVs, computers, etc. — with the household trash. They have to be recycled. Inevitably, some lunkheads will dump unwanted electronics in rural, illegal dumping spots. Here's hoping local agencies that have taken the lead in “e-waste” recycling will rise to meet the increased demand.

Congrats!: To Larry Crawford. After 20 years in office, the Armstrong County sheriff is calling it a career. During that time, Crawford has overseen improved security at the courthouse, made sure his office was active in the Armstrong Drug Task Force and started a handgun safety program for women. Look for a lots of people to run for the sheriff's office in the May primary.

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