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Saturday essay: Gun wrongs

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Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, 9:06 p.m.
 

The New York Times put up a pejorative piece of anti-gun prose Sunday last that truly mocks journalism.

Here's the headline: “Selling a new generation on guns.” Here's the subhead: “Industry recruits children using contests, games and semiautomatics.”

What follows are a dozen or so sneering paragraphs more than tacitly questioning the audacity of using the words “guns,” “education” and “safety” in any narrative proximity. Not until the story's 15th paragraph is there any semblance of balance — a quote from the president of the National Shooting Sports Federation about how instructing children in the safe use of firearms through hunting and target shooting is a very effective way to ingrain responsibility.

He's right, of course. But such agendized stories are par for the course when it comes to guns.

Just as are gross misrepresentations from pols pushing for populist feel-good gun “control” that history shows to be ineffectual if not just plain silly.

Think of, as The Washington Times' Emily Miller did, Sen. Dianne Feinstein including in her proposed weapons ban the ArmaLite M15 22LR Carbine. The California Democrat calls it an “assault rifle.” It's nothing more than a target-shooting “can plinker.”

Whether it's The New York Times or Mrs. Feinstein, it's representative of the gross ignorance and “progressive” elitism that's so sadly been allowed to dominate the gun discussion.

— Colin McNickle

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