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Pittsburgh Tuesday takes

| Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Say what?: We're not sure what's more outrageous — the sweetheart hiring of Vince Gastgeb, an Allegheny County councilman and a frozen and packaged foods salesman, for the newly created position of director of corporate and community relations at the county Airport Authority or his insistence, and that of council's counsel, Jack Cambest, that the county Home Rule Charter does not clearly prohibit Mr. Gastgeb from continuing in his council role — a gross conflict of interest — when clearly it does. This is the kind of nonsense that gives government a bad name.

Say what again?: The Toledo, Ohio, Block Bugler editorializes that “There's no civil right to big, sugar-heavy sodas.” Seriously? Allow us to translate: Government is our master. Government should be our dietitian. Government knows best. It's par for the course from a newspaper that once opined that taxpayers have no right to complain about how their tax dollars are used because once those taxes are paid, it's not the taxpayers' money anymore.

Ask the question!: The Pittsburgh Steelers are demanding in court that the city-county Sports & Exhibition Authority — i.e., the public — cover two-thirds of the cost of a Heinz Field expansion. The SEA counters that the demand does not comport with the team's lease. The expansion could put the public on the hook for millions of dollars of debt. Who has the guts to demand that the Steelers detail their projected profits from the expansion and how quickly its cost will be recouped without the public subsidy?

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