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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

It's disturbingly astounding that the Republican-held Pennsylvania Senate is even considering a heavily watered-down version of Gov. Tom Corbett's liquor-privatization plan. In fact, it would scuttle privatization. What's wrong with these clowns? Prohibition ended 80 years ago everywhere except in the Keystone State. And the voter drumbeat grows louder. ... Speaking of liquor privatization, Pennsylvania State Education Association boss Mike Crossey accuses Mr. Corbett of turning public school students into “bargaining chips” to sell his plan as a way to create education grants. Ah, the raven chides blackness. Consider, as Lincoln Institute boss Lowman Henry does, that teacher unions regularly use students as bargaining chips when they hold high the cudgel of a strike to extort more money from taxpayers. Mr. Crossey is sporting his clown nose again. ... The Obama administration is pushing for the expansion of voting “opportunities,” citing supposedly long waits for Americans to cast their ballots. But given that the average wait time for all voters in the United States last year was 14 minutes (and that's according to The New York Times), we can only conclude that Obama & Co. seek to expand opportunities for fraud. If anything, the government should be pushing to restrict voting to Election Day, save for the necessary and thoroughly vetted absentee ballots. .... Townhall.comreports that only one precinct in St. Lucie County, Fla., had a voter turnout of less than 113 percent in the November elections. One actually had a turnout of nearly 160 percent. But, according to “progressives,” voter fraud is a conservative myth. Ahem.

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