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Sunday pops

| Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Former Obama White House adviser David Axelrod has joined NBC and MSNBC as a “senior political analyst.” And the march of both outlets keeps going left, left, left, left. ... Asked Titan International CEO Maurice Taylor, when approached by the French “industrial renewal minister” to take over a Goodyear tire factory: “How stupid do you think we are?” It might have had something to do with the high wages for unionized employees said to work only three hours a day. Ahem. ... This monthin Oslo, Norway, 20 percent of the population tuned into a 12-hour TV program on the state-run NRK network. It pretty much was a shot of a burning fireplace and folks throwing on new logs as needed. The first four hours of “National Firewood Night” featured people talking about firewood. Do they know how to live or what? Or as The Beatles once put it, “isn't it good, Norwegian wood?” ... The National Rhetoric Service (OK, we made that up) issued its five-day forecast just after midnight in advance of Friday's “sequestration” deadline: “For the rest of Sunday, look for more presidential lies, followed by more steady presidentialprevarication on Monday. Come Tuesday, expect heavy obliquity from the president with a mix of mendacity and pretense from spokesman Jay Carney on Wednesday.

“Then things will really ramp up on Thursday with fallacy changing over to pure whoppers by lunchtime, then a spell of jive in the early afternoon followed by libel, slander and straight taradiddle as the deadline approaches.”

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