Share This Page

Greensburg Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

On the “Watch List”: Jeannette's recovery. An official with the state Department of Community and Economic Development says Jeannette's fouled-up finances are dire but that the city can still turn things around in three or so years and avoid being declared a distressed city subject to state oversight. As Jeannette already is in Pre-Act 47 Early Intervention, we trust the state now will hold the city council's feet to the fire.

An observation: In a prompt turnaround, Irwin Council agreed to rehire ex-police Chief Joseph Pocsatko — fired without explanation — so he could tender his resignation under an agreement that supposedly contains no monetary consideration, officials say. But if he files for unemployment compensation, the borough will not oppose it. This, after Pocsatko threatened a wrongful-termination appeal. Ah, there's the nub of the rub, eh?

Lance: To a grossly ignored pothole. Almost directly in front of the Westmoreland County Courthouse, at the busy intersection of East Otterman and South Main streets in Greensburg, there's a left-lane pothole that's been steadily deepening for weeks. As potholes go, this is a tough one to miss. Let's get it filled before somebody blows a tire.

R.I.P.: Bishop Alphonse Mascherino. His accomplishments extend beyond founding the Flight 93 Memorial Chapel near the jetliner's crash site in Somerset County. He also was a fine goodwill ambassador for the thousands of people nationwide who visit the memorial. Bishop Mascherino, 69, died Feb. 15. From a profound tragedy, he created something positive and enduring.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.