TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Kill the 'prevailing wage'

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Sunday, March 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Because more road and bridge work would be done under Gov. Tom Corbett's proposed $1.8 billion transportation package if Pennsylvania did away with its prevailing wage law, this is an ideal time to do the right thing for state taxpayers by repealing it.

Among conservative Republicans pushing to do so is Lancaster's Rep. Gordon Denlinger, who's sponsoring outright repeal legislation and wants to make prevailing wage reform part of this spring's transportation legislation.

The prevailing wage law's demise is long overdue. Applying to publicly funded construction projects worth more than $25,000, it in effect guarantees that unionized contractors get such work because its county-by-county pay standards reflect union wages, artificially hiking labor costs by at least 10 percent and pricing out nonunion contractors and workers.

Yes, prevailing wages still would apply to projects involving federal money under the Davis-Bacon Act. Yet reform at the state level would “save taxpayers tens of millions of dollars,” according to Rep. Stephen Bloom, R-Cumberland, making it a step in the right direction that's manifestly worth taking.

Of course, unions and their Democrat puppets will fight hard against doing so. Taxpayers must counter those special interests' influence by pressuring lawmakers of both parties to end prevailing wages' ongoing plundering of their pockets, which flies in the face of the public's best interests.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Editorials

  1. North Korea’s nukes: Object lesson ignored
  2. U.N. Watch: Follow China’s lead?
  3. EPA diktats: Pushing back
  4. Regional growth
  5. Pittsburgh Laurels & Lances
  6. Kittanning Laurels & Lances
  7. Greensburg Tuesday takes
  8. Greensburg Laurels & Lances
  9. Alle-Kiski Laurels & Lances
  10. The Brady affair: Contract law