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Alle-Kiski Tuesday takes

| Monday, March 4, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Train is late: In addition to the untold hundreds of millions of dollars the Alle-Kiski Valley commuter rail will cost the taxpayers for construction and operating subsidies, the line has another problem. By the time the rail line between Lower Burrell and Pittsburgh is up and running — optimistically predicted to be 2018 — the reconstruction project on Route 28 will be done and, hopefully, the current traffic problems to downtown solved.

No waiver: PennDOT Secretary Barry Schoch says he's considering granting mass-transit agencies an exemption to a state law that prohibits bus, trolley and train drivers from driving more than 10 hours per shift. Some Port Authority of Allegheny County drivers are behind the wheel or controls for up to 16 hours. Transit agencies say they thought they were exempt from the law, and compliance will cost millions of dollars. The law's in place for a reason — the public's safety. No waivers should be granted.

BoNY-headed: Anybody think Bank of New York Mellon might be dealing with a teensy-weensy morale problem these days? Thursday last, the banking giant paid more than 100 managers bonuses totaling about $460 million. But just six days before, rank-and-file employees were told their annual merit raises had been pushed back to July from the usual April date. The bank won't say why. It's the kind of behavior that cultivates a workforce of drones.

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