TribLIVE

| Opinion/The Review

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Alle-Kiski Tuesday takes

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Monday, March 4, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Train is late: In addition to the untold hundreds of millions of dollars the Alle-Kiski Valley commuter rail will cost the taxpayers for construction and operating subsidies, the line has another problem. By the time the rail line between Lower Burrell and Pittsburgh is up and running — optimistically predicted to be 2018 — the reconstruction project on Route 28 will be done and, hopefully, the current traffic problems to downtown solved.

No waiver: PennDOT Secretary Barry Schoch says he's considering granting mass-transit agencies an exemption to a state law that prohibits bus, trolley and train drivers from driving more than 10 hours per shift. Some Port Authority of Allegheny County drivers are behind the wheel or controls for up to 16 hours. Transit agencies say they thought they were exempt from the law, and compliance will cost millions of dollars. The law's in place for a reason — the public's safety. No waivers should be granted.

BoNY-headed: Anybody think Bank of New York Mellon might be dealing with a teensy-weensy morale problem these days? Thursday last, the banking giant paid more than 100 managers bonuses totaling about $460 million. But just six days before, rank-and-file employees were told their annual merit raises had been pushed back to July from the usual April date. The bank won't say why. It's the kind of behavior that cultivates a workforce of drones.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Editorials

  1. North Korea’s nukes: Object lesson ignored
  2. U.N. Watch: Follow China’s lead?
  3. EPA diktats: Pushing back
  4. Pittsburgh Tuesday takes
  5. Sunday pops
  6. Regional growth
  7. The Box
  8. Kittanning Laurels & Lances
  9. The Brady affair: Contract law
  10. Yes, the IRS targeted conservatives
  11. Medicare @ 50: Sick, getting sicker