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Monday, March 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Released in a classic late-Friday “document dump” this month, the State Department's long-awaited environmental-impact assessment of the Keystone XL pipeline couldn't find so much as a sandworm threatened by the project.

Neither wetlands, nor water resources, nor vegetation, nor fish, nor wildlife, nor soil, nor endangered species — not even so-called climate change — would be adversely affected by a pipeline that would carry oil from Canada to Texas. So much for the “carbon bomb,” as the pipeline is characterized by eco-wackos.

Oh, and the pipeline also meets 57 safety requirements specified by the administration.

But now, the State Department has thrown a curve ball:

With rail transit among other options, America doesn't need the pipeline. What's needed is more vigorous (if not delaying) public debate, according to a State official.

Excuse us, but for three years and for no valid reason the administration has held up a project that's expected to create 179,000 U.S. jobs and deliver up to 830,000 barrels of oil per day, based on figures compiled by The Heritage Foundation.

And while the administration searches for more pipeline non sequiturs, other nations, most notably China, are scrambling to secure as much oil as they can.

If the U.S. doesn't build this pipeline, the oil simply goes elsewhere. Some “energy policy,” eh?

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