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Pittsburgh Tuesday takes

| Monday, March 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Hollow “victory”: Pittsburgh Controller Michael Lamb won the mayoral endorsement of the city's Democrat apparatus on Sunday. Had he not, it would have been a shocker, considering he was the only candidate. Councilman Bill Peduto did not seek the endorsement. And five other wannabes who entered the race after incumbent Democrat Luke Ravenstahl bowed out weren't eligible. Given that scenario, the committee's endorsement doesn't mean squat.

Where was Luke?: Mr. Ravenstahl had been on the incognito side of things since abandoning his re-election bid two weeks ago. He surfaced Monday but was largely invisible last week. Mum's the word amongst his staff. Heck, they won't even release his official calendar. And that's on top of news that there's not much of a paper trail of his travel expenses. What's next, the hiring of another lawyer as a tacit warning to not seek answers? It's no way to run an administration.

Port Authority changes?: Pennsylvania Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati says he'll introduce a bill to restructure Allegheny County's mass-transit agency. Joe Scarnati, a Jefferson County Republican, cites the Port Authority's perennial financial woes. Pardon us if we consider his proposal suspect. For there's a move afoot to “regionalize” the Port Authority across county lines. Trading a big mess for an even bigger mess should be a nonstarter.

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