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Sunday pops

| Saturday, March 16, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority is defending the use of three SEPTA buses to take off-duty employees to Harrisburg to rally for more state money on Feb. 11. And it wasn't the first time. But since a contractor lobbying group paid for turnpike tolls and fuel costs totaling nearly $632, there was no cost to the authority (i.e., taxpayers), one official told the Pennsylvania Independent. No cost? Who paid for those buses, you goobers?! ... The folks at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (yes, there really is one) are touting the economic benefits of drones — nearly 104,000 jobs and more than $82 billion in economic impact between 2015 and 2025. But they failed to mention the increased economic benefits of the sale of all those firearms and electronic jamming devices to all those pesky private property aficionados. Ahem. ... President Obama has nominated Deborah Jones to be the new U.S. ambassador to Libya. Gee, wonder if she asked Mr. Obama if he'll hang her out to die as he did Christopher Stevens, the man she's replacing? ... Democrats are so unserious about spending that their proposed new budget would increase spending by 62 percent over the next decade. That's $2.2 trillion more by 2023. There's a highly technical economic phrase for this: They're nuts.

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