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Perez at Labor?: The man is unfit

| Thursday, March 14, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez lied under oath about politicizing the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, which he heads, making him manifestly unfit to be secretary of Labor — yet President Obama reportedly intends to nominate him.

His record raises other grave concerns. Mr. Perez:

• Was on the board of an illegal-alien advocacy group funded by far-left billionaire George Soros and the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez

• Led Justice's 2012 assault on elections' integrity via court challenges of state voter-ID laws

• Refused, in congressional testimony, to rule out U.S. use of Saudi-style death-for-insulting-Islam laws.

And now, a federal judge agrees that he lied when he told the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights that political leadership wasn't involved in Justice dropping its New Black Panther Party voter-intimidation case.

Awarding fees and costs to Judicial Watch, the judge wrote that Justice documents the group sued to obtain “reveal that political appointees ... were conferring about the status and resolution of the New Black Panther Party case ... which would appear to contradict ... Perez's testimony ... .”

Why, then, should anyone believe anything Perez would say in Senate confirmation hearings? Unfit even for his current job, Thomas Perez is unworthy even of being nominated for the Labor post. But if he is, Senate Republicans must do whatever it takes to ensure that he never joins the Cabinet.

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