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Greensburg Tuesday takes

| Monday, March 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Fix it: Officials say ongoing state computer outages, occurring since January, are stymieing concealed-weapon licensing at the Westmoreland County Courthouse. Citizens who take time out of their workday to exercise their Second Amendment right shouldn't have to “come back later” to get their licenses. No more excuses. Fix the problem — now.

Jeannette's future governance: As the cash-strapped city circles the bowl, so to speak, options under review include the adoption of home rule. But a state official, meeting recently with Jeannette's leaders, zeroed in on the wrong home-rule “benefit” — that is, it would allow the city to raise taxes beyond the limit set by the Third Class City Code. So, let's give more money to fiscal savants who've been unable for years to properly manage what they're getting now? The last thing Jeannette needs is additional incentive to drive more businesses and homeowners out of the city.

The ol' wink & nod: Gary Davis, the ex-chairman of the Jeannette Municipal Authority, received a nearly $6,500 lesson from the State Ethics Commission for participating in the hiring of his wife for an authority job — and one for which she allegedly had no experience. Such brazen favoritism attributed to the authority's former chairman, no less, raises a disturbing question: How many government job hirings at the local level fly under the state ethics radar and get winked-winked along? We can only imagine.

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