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Border security: Following a cow path

| Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The timing couldn't have been more apropos.

As four U.S. senators from the so-called “Gang of Eight,” who are working on immigration reform, toured the U.S. border in Nogales, Ariz., last week in full showboat mode, an illegal alien scaled an 18-foot border fence nearby and was arrested in view of the group.

And how many illegals that same day crossed the border without running into U.S. senators?

That didn't concern this group of “fact-finders.” Instead, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., offered this remarkable observation: “One of the things we learned is that a lot of people (who) cross the border are doing it for drug purposes too.” No kidding.

The bipartisan group insists that any pathway to citizenship for more than 11 million illegals in the U.S. must be contingent on measurable advances in border security, The New York Times reports. But exactly how is that defined?

The Obama administration says it has made significant gains on border enforcement. Yet two years after Homeland Security vowed to produce new, more accurate standards to assess the nation's borders, senior Homeland officials recently acknowledged these new measures have not been devised and they don't expect them anytime soon, The Times reports.

So, amid the bluster that an immigration deal is nigh, there's nothing to suggest that the nation is any closer to comprehensive border security.

And without measurable border enforcement, the case for immigration reform follows the same ol' circular cow path that leads nowhere.

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