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Pittsburgh Laurels & Lances

| Thursday, April 4, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

Lance: To Opening Day gridlock — again . Monday's 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh Pirates opener at PNC Park was a traffic nightmare for both fans and commuters, jamming North Shore streets by 9 a.m. Yet off-duty city police working traffic details weren't supposed to be in place until 10:30 and on-duty traffic officers didn't get assignments until about 11:15. Expect this nightmare to repeat for each opener until the Pirates and the city actually learn from experience.

Laurel (with a caveat): To cleaning up your own mess. When Pittsburgh SWAT personnel realized they'd mistakenly broken into a Sheraden home last Saturday — erroneously thinking they had a search warrant not just for a neighboring house but for that one, too — they commendably pulled back immediately, had Public Works board up the damage and referred the homeowner to city lawyers for reimbursement. But such an error, which can cause much worse than property damage, is unacceptable — period — and never should occur.

On the “Watch List”: Justice for an alleged indoor “tagger.” Unfortunately, the most fitting outcome won't occur for University of Pittsburgh student Daniel Khan-Yousufzai, 21, accused of spray-painting “WRC” — shorthand for an anti-sweatshop group some want Pitt to join — on a Cathedral of Learning sandstone hallway. He won't end up scrubbing it with a toothbrush because Pitt already cleaned up the damage, estimated at up to $100,000. But if convicted, he must face similarly severe consequences.

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