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Sunday pops

| Saturday, April 13, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Members of the “global snow sports community” have sent a letter to President Obama claiming that “winter is in trouble” because of global warming. “(B)ecause we know this warming is human-caused,” and citing lost economic activity, the group urges the president to limit carbon pollution from power plants and to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. We have only three words for these climate cluckers — track and field. ... The Government Accountability Office says the finances and ridership projections of a proposed multibillion-dollar California high-speed-rail project are a mess. Key to the mess is missing “risk and uncertainty” data that are key to gauging the project's success or failure. The plug on this taxpayer-soaking boondoggle never should have been plugged in. ... Evan Soltas, writing for Bloomberg Ticker, notes that spending on public infrastructure in the United States has been pretty steady over the last 20 years. And he adds that while 29.9 percent of our bridges were rated “deficient” in 2009 — which, he reminds, does not mean they're on the verge of collapse — 37.8 percent were rated so in 1989. “(T)he idea that the U.S. has an infrastructure crisis” is a myth, Mr. Soltas writes. “A broad permanent increase in spending is unwarranted.” We can't wait for the nasty letters from the Infrastructure-Industrial Complex, the Society for the Preservation of Padded Contracts and Local 22 of AUUFWDJO — the Amalgamated Union of Using Five Workers to Do the Job of One.

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