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The U.N.'s Human Wrongs Council: Terrorists' best friend

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Sunday, April 28, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

A United Nations Human Rights Council official's reprehensible assertion that “Boston got what it deserved,” as a headline put it, should prompt a U.S. exit from both the council and the U.N. But don't hold your breath — the council's long history of apologetics for terrorists seems not to bother the Obama administration in the least.

U.S. membership on the council was among this administration's first foreign-policy actions. Assistant Secretary of State Esther Brimmer called the council “this esteemed body” at its March session. Yet the statement published at by Richard Falk, a U.N. special rapporteur for human rights in the Palestinian territories, deserves excoriation, not esteem.

A 9/11 conspiracy theorist who's also anti-Israel, Mr. Falk minimizes the Boston Marathon bombings. He characterizes the search for the bombers as a “somewhat hysterical Boston dragnet” and downplays the victims' suffering. And he even justifies the bombings as “blowback” against a U.S. “global domination project ... bound to generate all kinds of resistance in the post-colonial world.”

Such is the prevailing outlook of the U.N. Human Rights Council. It's controlled by Organization of Islamic Cooperation member states, which lately demanded that a U.N. definition of terrorism include an exception for “legitimate struggle.”

By remaining on the Human Rights Council and in the U.N., the Obama administration cozies up to — and financially supports — despicable legitimization of terrorist attacks against Americans.

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