ShareThis Page

Saturday essay: Call of the wild(-eyed)

| Friday, May 10, 2013, 8:57 p.m.

The coyotes have arrived in Mt. Lebanon. At least that's what the lady walking by with her puppy, an already-gigunda designer dog, said the other day on a Sunset Hills street.

Concerned, as she should be, she called the municipality and said she was told that coyotes would help control the feral cat population.

Ah, don't we all feel better?

If there's one coyote in Mt. Lebanon, it's surely not alone. There have been previous sightings. And coyotes being coyotes, lots of little coyotes soon follow. (Remember that howling two months ago?) The literature reminds that coyotes can run up to 40 mph in pursuit of prey. And come fall, they form packs for more effective hunting.

Now, besides the wild cats that they might feast upon, the coyotes will find an eclectic menu in the South Hills community — injured and sick deer (the result of a failure to cull the herd for a number of years), wild turkey, red fox, rabbits and, yes, rats.

Or the occasional family cat testing its night vision in the dusk, small dogs put out on leashes to do their dooty before bedtime and, perhaps, children scurrying home before last light.

Oh, and coyotes like watermelon, too. Probably removes the bitter taste of the suburban smorgasbord.

Of course, there will be a coyote tipping point in Lebo. But coyote being deer, so to speak, don't expect much to be done — other than the wild-eyed loony lefties urging the banning of family cats, small dogs, children and watermelon.

— Colin McNickle

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.