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Sunday pops

| Saturday, May 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The speaker of the California Assembly says he's “deeply concerned about media outlets being purchased to further a political agenda.” John Perez is referring to speculation that billionaire brothers David and Charles Koch, economic conservatives and social libertarians, are considering buying the Los Angeles Times, among other newspapers. Never mind that the L.A. Times has been furthering the far-left political agenda for decades. ... Things have gotten so bad for the Miami Marlins — they rank last in the National League for attendance thus far this year — they have decided to close, for certain weekday games, the upper bowl of Marlins Park. That's about 10,000 seats. It already was the smallest stadium in the Majors (by actual capacity). And for all this nonperformance, taxpayers are left holding a debt bag of $2.4 billion. Is this a great country or what? ... Republican Montgomery County Commissioner Bruce Castor now says he won't challenge GOP Gov. Tom Corbett in next year's primary. He said his duties as a commissioner, as a lawyer in private practice and family responsibilities “make a massive undertaking such as running for governor impossible for me this election cycle.” Translation: Mr. Castor could raise no money, could garner no endorsements and would receive about as many votes for governor as Lester Nauhaus would for Judge of the Year.

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