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The Benghazi hearing: Sunlight ahead

| Monday, May 6, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

A much clearer picture of the Sept. 11, 2012, debacle at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi that left four Americans dead, including our ambassador to Libya — and the Obama administration's dishonest, self-serving misrepresentation of that organized terrorist act — comes Wednesday.

That's when the House Oversight & Government Committee will hold a hearing titled “Benghazi: Exposing Failure and Recognizing Courage.” Beyond what's already known — including then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's April 2012 approval of reduced U.S. diplomatic security in Libya — expect:

• Details about watering down initial talking points to remove mentions of al-Qaida and terrorism in favor of the spurious “spontaneous protest against an anti-Muslim U.S. video” line. The Weekly Standard's Stephen F. Hayes writes that emails sent during that process make it “clear that senior administration officials engaged in a wholesale rewriting of intelligence assessments about Benghazi in order to mislead the public.”

• Testimony from Gregory N. Hicks, then-deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Embassy in Libya, who “thought it was a terrorist attack from the start,” according to The Washington Times.

• Evidence of administration threats to the careers of Mr. Hicks and fellow whisteblower witnesses.

Wednesday's hearing will help ensure that the administration can keep neither its Benghazi bungling nor the American people — who deserve the full, appalling truth — in the dark.

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